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Peru

Recent Blog Posts from Peru

I'm here :)   (published in Peru)

April 5, 2013 by   Comments(0)

Well I've been here nearly 2 weeks after a bumpy start my flight was cancelled for 2 days because of snow!how hen I arrived at my host family's house I was completely overwhelmed.. So so homesick the first 2 days! That's something no1 writes on here so expect that. It was the lack of Spanish that made it extremely hard, luckily my nice housemate was able to communicate so that helps. If I was to give advice is DO NOT COME OUT HERE WITH NO SPANISH. I'm starting lessons this week so hopefully I can communicate with my family.. My school is a kindergarten just outside Pisac were I am living called cuyo chico, kids are nuts but their so cute.. Last weekend I went to cusco with the other volunteers for a night out they are so so lovely making me feel abit less homesick. I'm here for 2 months and already nearly 2 weeks gone.Still getting used to the crowed taxis, bad drivers and questionable food aside all that and lack so Spanish I'm settling in fine! Everything is so cheap.. Pisac is beautiful, it's my favourite out of calca and urubamba! Aside all the negative things peru is absolutely breath taking (literally also lol) everyone is so laid back which is nice! Heading out this weekend in cusco again so that should be fun!bookin machu pichuu soon so I can't wait for that!! Looking forward to meeting more volunteers

gemma xx

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I'm here :)https://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/gwallace/read/277514/im-here-
I'm here :)
 

Cara Barbato helps make a difference teaching the importance of nutrition in the Urubamba valley in Cusco   (published in Peru)

April 3, 2013 by   Comments(0)

Her passion for helping others and a desire to experience a different culture brought Cara Barbato, 21-years-old, from the University of Delaware to the beautiful Andes in Urubamba, Peru. Pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Dietetics converted Cara into a very valuable volunteer for the Nutrition Project which she participated in for one month though Projects Abroad. Through this project, she had the chance to make a difference to the lives of mothers and children in the area.

During her first two weeks, Cara was involved in several different activities. She participated in a three day workshop through the government program Vaso de leche (glass of milk), during which she taught mothers about the nutrition pyramid and played games related to it. Additionally she was involved in dental fluoride campaigns in different towns around the Urubamba valley, giving children above the age of four fluoride treatments on their teeth and teaching them about good dental care and what foods contribute to healthy teeth. For a few days Cara joined volunteers at the Care Project in their Summer school where she taught basic nutrition information, such as differentiating fruits from vegetables and why each food group is important.

For the remaining time she was based in the Centro de Vigilancia de Ccotowincho with another volunteer, Livia Berg from the USA. This center is always in need of volunteers as it provides breakfast and lunch for pregnant women, mothers and young children. Here Cara and Livia ran nutrition education workshops a couple of times a week and played nutrition related games with the mothers, helping to create bonds and trust with them, something the workers at the center don’t normally do. “Projects Abroad supplied all of the games and learning materials; ...

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Cara Barbato helps make a difference teaching the importance of nutrition in the Urubamba valley in Cuscohttps://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/peru-social-manager/read/277197/cara-barbato-helps-make-a-difference-teaching-the-importance-of-nutrition-in-the-urubamba-valley-in-cusco
Cara Barbato helps make a difference teaching the importance of nutrition in the Urubamba valley in Cusco
 

Semana Santa   (published in Peru)

March 31, 2013 by   Comments(0)

This past week has been Semana Santa, what we would call Easter week, but so much more. Peru is a very devoutly Catholic country, with the concept of being an atheist not really entertained. As such Easter is a seriously big deal. Every day in Urubamba this week there have been processions of Jesus around the town, and since Friday my family have been going to church from about 5pm-10pm every night. Hard core! 

One of the big bonuses of this crazy religion was the meal on Friday. 12 courses, to celebrate the 12 disciples at the last supper. Actually we only had eight, plus water and tea, which seems pretty unfair to the disciples left out. But fair enough in terms of the amount of cooking! I shall explain in detailk the dishes we had, so if for some reason this holds no interest to you (weirdos) then scroll to the end. 

1. a salad of boiled and blanched broad beans with onion and tomato in a limey dressing, with a slice of potato. Yummy and a light way to start the meal. And before you begin to feel full just thinking about all this foos it was tiny portions!

2. a soup of the sea, with seaweed and loads of fish eggs in. Kind of weird, not exactly delicious but tasty in a fishy kind of way. The fish eggs were nothing like caviar, much crunchier, and all strung together on nasty membrane stuff. It´s the only dish which every family has to have in this meal, and the only time of year they´re allowed to eat it.

3. causa, a dish made from layers of mashed potato seasoned with mild chillies, with tuna mayo in between. Sounds a bit nasty but is so so yummy.

4. fried fish with fried potato. No meat is allowed to be eaten in the whole meal.

5. now on to pudding. First was apples and peaches poached in a dark sugar syrup. Very yummy.

6. empanadas de semana ...

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Semana Santahttps://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/tserle/read/276611/semana-santa
Semana Santa
 

Moving up to big school!   (published in Peru)

March 31, 2013 by   Comments(0)

For the past couple of weeks I´ve been in big school, teaching English to kids between 11 and 16. Scary stuff! It was rather daunting initially, especially when they started interrogating me in rapid Spanish. ´Do you have any pets? What´s your favourite food? What´s England like? Do you have a boyfriend?´etc. But the feeling of being the new-kid is starting to wear off!

School starts every day at 8, when they do a whole school chant and march (a bit odd, not quite sure what they´re saying, but something to do with working extra hard everyday for the service of the world). Then we have two double lessons, then a 30 minute break, and then one more double and one single. And then that´s it! They all finish school at 1:45. The school is called agropecuario,  which means it´s a farming school (they actually have lessons in farming), and most of the children come from families who work in farming. As such they all go home to help on the farm, while the city kids get to go home just to watch tv. 

As they have one double English lesson a week (only 1.5 hours) it´s nigh on impossible to fit in the full government prescribed syllabus. Most of the 16 year olds are still working from the first text book, and their English is very basic. Really basic is an exageration. The majority struggled to say ´How old are you?´. It´s a shame as they´re really eager to learn, and their teacher (who I work with) is a really good teacher, engaging and funny. With more time every week they coule be progressing so much faster, and in a county where tourism is the fastest rising industry they really do need English. 

But apart from that little rant it´s great. I feel like I´m learning as much as ...

(0 from 0 votes)
 
Moving up to big school!https://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/tserle/read/276606/moving-up-to-big-school
Moving up to big school!
 

Moving up to big school!   (published in Peru)

March 31, 2013 by   Comments(0)

For the past couple of weeks I´ve been in big school, teaching English to kids between 11 and 16. Scary stuff! It was rather daunting initially, especially when they started interrogating me in rapid Spanish. ´Do you have any pets? What´s your favourite food? What´s England like? Do you have a boyfriend?´etc. But the feeling of being the new-kid is starting to wear off!

School starts every day at 8, when they do a whole school chant and march (a bit odd, not quite sure what they´re saying, but something to do with working extra hard everyday for the service of the world). Then we have two double lessons, then a 30 minute break, and then one more double and one single. And then that´s it! They all finish school at 1:45. The school is called agropecuario,  which means it´s a farming school (they actually have lessons in farming), and most of the children come from families who work in farming. As such they all go home to help on the farm, while the city kids get to go home just to watch tv. 

As they have one double English lesson a week (only 1.5 hours) it´s nigh on impossible to fit in the full government prescribed syllabus. Most of the 16 year olds are still working from the first text book, and their English is very basic. Really basic is an exageration. The majority struggled to say ´How old are you?´. It´s a shame as they´re really eager to learn, and their teacher (who I work with) is a really good teacher, engaging and funny. With more time every week they coule be progressing so much faster, and in a county where tourism is the fastest rising industry they really do need English. 

But apart from that little rant it´s great. I feel like I´m learning as much as ...

(0 from 0 votes)
 
Moving up to big school!https://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/tserle/read/276605/moving-up-to-big-school
Moving up to big school!
 

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