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September 2014

GORILLAS GALORE : 'Just crouch down and munch bamboo'   (published in Tanzania)

September 24, 2014 by   Comments(0)

                                                  GORILLAS GALORE

 

 

                              ‘Just crouch  down and munch  bamboo .’

 

 

The planned visit to  the gorillas up there in the Virunga mountains  was tainted with some ambivalence  , a bit of dread:  I booked from the UK  , encouraged by my grandchildren, but had to swallow hard at the non-returnable $750 for an hour with the gorillas. Not much of a bang for your buck , as the Americans say . And I doubted the  spiritual experience described by others at seeing our next closest living relatives after the chimpanzee ( we share 95%- 99% of the gorilla’s DNA ). And it felt selfish and embarrassing when so many are starving in so many places.  But the core truth of the matter is that I was really worried that I would not make it up the mountain: that steep, slippy, muddy mountainside with only nettles to clutch or avoid . And bits of bamboo occasionally.

 

  The triumph of trepidation over excitement was not helped by reading in preparation ‘The Dark Romance of Dian Fossey ‘ , an excellent account,  I believe ,but a most sinister tale. I finished it the night before the big adventure  and Kavos and I departed early the next morning . Still contemplating the fate of Dian Fossey I put on a bright little face .In Rwanda, driving along the roads in the early morning has your eyes out in stalks :  the colourful, graceful women, balancing the conical baskets on their heads, very fat pigs strapped to the pillion of bicycles , still alive ; children on their way to school and many, outside the home-made brick huts, playing in the dirt and waving as we passed;  columns of carrots being arranged by the roadside ; men with muscles balancing huge loads on bicycles.  Maybe I could alight and take photographs instead ?

 

We arrived with our permits at the set-off point . As Kavos went off to check us in ,

I watched the Rwanda dancers , the Intore with their lions mane headdresses, shields, and spears, leaping and twirling  against the background of the volcano, Muhabura . 

Most stirring and heartening ! There was also coffee  for us but  as things get very basic  aaround gorillas : you cannot pee or  poop  or sneeze when with the gorillas so I declined the wonderful  aromatic Rwandan coffee .  Carved  walking sticks were handed out. Kavos , as my companion,graciously accepted being in the slow group for older or unfit people . Our group, was going to the closest  gorilla family group, the Sabinyo Group.  We sat together,  resigned to not being, the high flyers ,filling out forms and being instructed before setting off.

 

I liked walking through the potato fields - potatoes have such a lovely flower

and I thought of Dian Fossey living on potatoes when her income from National Geographic did not turn up as it should . She must have gone up and down those mountains a lot so If she could do it frequently surely I could do it once.  We came to the foot of our mountain  , the Bisoki volcano :  guards , looking quite intimidating but handsome,

were there with their guns ; the guides, whom we met in the little circle were there ;  and so were the porters ready  to carry rucksacks . The guides went over the instructions again and told us about gorilla noises : an EH EH like a  sharp cough,  from them was an aggressive noise . A low  friendly growl  from deep within your chest was a friendly conversational one. We tried them out ,there and then,  but when I asked if we could practise on the way up was told a firm’ NO. ‘  Also , it was important not to look the gorillas in the eye and if one got angry and charged  we were instructed to  ‘crouch and munch bamboo’.

 

It was steep , slippy and muddy but Patrick, my porter had everything in hand : he held my hand or arm firmly , steadying me up, before I could even think of floundering. Kavos pushed me from behind  when it seemed fitting. In the damp,misty air,  I re-call the pungent smell of human sweat, including my own, and felt alive. If there was a very deep muddy stretch, Patrick, with another porter  or Kavos, just lifted me up  and onwards so my feet scarcely touched the ground .  We climbed at a brisk pace , no time to have doubts or look at the view until we came to a glade .  Here we were told that the trackers had spotted the gorillas and that we were half-way there. 

 

 

 However, shortly thereafter, the trackers  appeared and said we were close : we fell silent as we were carefully led to a spot in this bamboo forest where we left  our rucksacks and  only carried  our cameras .

Also a last pee.  We had only been climbing for one and a half hours.  I was last to reach the huge silver back  reclining on its back , luxuriating on the forest floor , bending and stretching . 

Such delightful indolence and insouciance . Massive feet. It ignored us totally. I thought I might be on another planet :

several yards away in a bamboo thicket  were several  other gorillas of different ages , sitting munching bamboo  , feet , particularly, the big toe,  often  wrapped around a tree.

 

The babies were swinging on creepers ,upsides down ,  tumbling and swiping each other and one swiped me as it passed by. 

 

 A very large silver back strode in my direction and I was about to ‘crouch down and munch bamboo’ as instructed  ,when I realised that it was just off on its own trajectory and passing me ,

not heading for me.  But it was thrilling to be so close, to hold ones position calmly, to observe them just living their lives. Playing. Eating. Stroking each other.

The gorillas are what we call ’habituated’ ,to being watched by we humans  . Dian Fossey, unlike her predecessors ,who remained silently in the thicket, in order to preserve objectivity, made more contact with the gorillas as she’ habituated ‘them to humans.

Some disapproved of her method and believed in greater distance for research.  However, it is thanks to her that we are now able to be around them without disturbing their equanimity.   There were lots of deep chest noises and we joined in . 

Intently watching another species in their own habitat is  an experience like no other as the senses sharpen and  quiver, and assumed knowledge palls in the face of the real thing. I wanted to pick up ‘a baby’ ,

to stroke a furry back, but one did not need to be told not to , because it would have been presumptuous , taking a  liberty , as well as causing an  aggressive charge  .

They were letting us watch them and that was enough.  They came close to us .We remained still. They surrounded us , unperturbed . Influenced by their presence we kept calm.

 

Then Kavos phone vibrated and informed us we were in the Congo and did he want to join the Congo net work ?.  From the sublime to the ridiculous : from communing with nature to intrusive modern technology 

A few minutes later there was another message , we were in Rwanda  - did he ???  Then we were in Congo again.  A bit like a military two-step .

 

 

 The gorillas then moved off to a glade where we could see the mothers carry their babies underneath,

clinging to their bellies  or on their backs ,like jockeys on horseback,

or sometimes stopping to  nurse them.

 

The little tribe slowly and nonchalantly wandered over the glade ,  pausing at will, the large silver back leisurely bringing up the rear,

until they disappeared into the forest  . 

We had had more than an hour with them , because of their trajectory. We were lucky.

 

I was delighted with our visit. I cannot say that the gorillas were exactly beautiful but they were extraordinary with ‘human ‘ gestures which strike an odd chord . Or is it really that we have ‘gorilla’ gestures ?  After all they were  here on earth  before us. But , more importantly,  they were themselves ,  so uninhibited and unself-conscious : eating when hungry,  gambling, playing, even a little squabble, moving past  or even through us or off into the thickets or bamboo forest. We were not one of them and they were not one of us.  There is a beauty in that separation. 

 

We parted company with the trekkers who continued to trek the gorillas so they could find them the next morning . Also to check that they were alright  and not ill, and to act if they were ill ,by calling in  the gorilla doctors . The guards also scouted about up there in the Virungas checking for poachers( and ,I was informed later, for people crossing the border without visas,  from Congo. )Dian Fossey would have  experienced a dilemma if she knew : her beloved gorillas being protected from extinction  but by  eco-tourism , and the Rwandan policies of economic growth . There were 8 of us : gaping tourists at $750 bucks a bang ! And there were other groups of 8 all over the mountains. The gorillas bring in money for Rwanda : it is a roaring trade and  they are increasing in number and giving employment to many.

 

I would like to say that I floated down the mountain in a euphoric state , having communed with the gorillas , and that is partly true, but I was led expertly by the porters  and Kavos, and whisked over the thick , deep,  muddy parts, yet again .

At first, , the triumph I felt  was at having survived the climb and descent: I had not held up the group, fallen head over heels in the mud .  Well, only once . I had not been put in a basket,* or sneezed and therefore infected a gorilla , thereby contributing to their extinction . I had achieved what I had ambivalently set out to do ,with the help of a very efficient and caring  team. And I loved it.

 

 

 Once off the mountain ,I staggered to the  4WD ,  really  wasted.  Later, over a glass of Primus Beer,  Kavos, Elaine and I  stretched out like the gorillas and growled deeply in our chests  : I  thought of those amazing primates ,munching quietly , frolicking , doing somersaults 

, strolling  nonchalantly, on the Virunga Mountain Chain,in and out of Rwanda and Congo as  they pleased. If I ever do have to ‘crouch and eat  bamboo’ I would much rather eat humble pie for  a huge gorilla than any human being on this planet. 

 

         *

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GORILLAS GALORE : 'Just crouch down and munch bamboo'https://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/LaoLao/read/367683/gorillas-galore--just-crouch-down-and-munch-bamboo
GORILLAS GALORE : 'Just crouch down and munch bamboo'
 

DANISH VOLUNTEERS MAKE A HUGE MIDEWIFERY IMPACT IN TANZANIA   (published in Tanzania)

September 24, 2014 by   Comments(0)

 

Michelle Eskerod and Anne Levring  Montensen  are students at the Univercity College of Nordjylland in Dermark who worked for four weeks at  Mwananyamala Hospital as  Projects Abroad’s volunteers.

They travelled all the way from Denmark so as to experience the birth culture in Tanzania comparing to back home Denmark.

The two girls were hard working, a thing which brought a huge impact in their placement Mwananyamala Hospital in Dar es Salaam.

Michelle and Anne were able to conduct 68 Deliveries within this short time of only for weeks while working even at night different from how they were supposed to work.  They had to even work in extra hours just because of the passion in what they were doing. Staff members from the hospital were very happy with these two volunteers because they helped them a lot.

With the situation in the hospital which was not that much satisfactory, Michelle and Anne decided to also donate some few things in the hospital.

Before coming to volunteer in Tanzania, Michelle and Anne conducted a donation from friends and other people. They got 675 lovely hats for babies from women in Denmark who are volunteering in knitting. The hats were given to the new born babies.

 ‘‘In the Mwananyamala area all pregnant women were talking how nice it was to deliver at Mwananyamala Hospital because they would get Muzungu Hats’’ Michelle Says.

Aso they used social media  Facebook to get some money which they donated at Mwananyamala Hospital.

 Anne says, ‘‘We organized the donation on Facebook where friends and family from Denmark donated more than 525 $. We spent the money on a suction machine, BP-measurement machines, stethoscopes, feotoscopes, delivery-kits and disinfection gel.’’

Michelle’s and Anne’s donations plus  their hard working  was a huge job they did in their Placement to the extent of leaving a gap in the midwifery unit at Mwananyamala Hopsital. They worked as if they were not volunteers rather as full time workers.

Projects Abroad and the Staff members at the hospital thanked the Volunteers for their lovely heart of working tirelessly.

The volunteers went back home to finish up their studies, they real have a big memory of life in Tanzania as they were impressed with how people here are friendly and welcoming.

 

Michelle Eskerod and Anne Leureng  Montensen 

Donation from the  525 $. (suction machine, BP-measurement machines, stethoscopes, feotoscopes, delivery-kits and disinfection gel.)

 

A baby with a hat which was donate by the two Volunteers

The two Vulunteers at the Hospital

A baby with one of the hats wich were given to each baby

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DANISH VOLUNTEERS MAKE A HUGE MIDEWIFERY IMPACT IN TANZANIAhttps://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/Seleman/read/367635/danish-volunteers-make-a-huge-midewifery-impact-in-tanzania
DANISH VOLUNTEERS MAKE A HUGE MIDEWIFERY IMPACT IN TANZANIA
 

INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF ARTS AND CULTURE IN BAGAMOYO   (published in Tanzania)

September 22, 2014 by   Comments(0)

 

This week the very famous Institute of Arts and Culture in East Africa is conducting an International 33rd festival of Arts and Culture in Bagamoyo Pwani. Bagamoyo is the tourist district few Kilometers from Dar es Salaam, it is where the International Institute of Arts and Culture is located.

In 1980s  the Bagamoyo Art Festival began, it is incredibly the most exciting event each year  for civilians in Bagamoyo and the country.  Many people from  across the Country and continents attend  to witness this festival  because it also involves artists from all over the World.

The Taasisi ya Sanaa na Utamaduni Bagamoyo TASUBA (The institute of Arts and Culture) has organize the event to start 22nd-28th of September 2014 while involving artists from Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Democratic Republic of  Congo, Germany, Norway  and Brazil.

More than 136 artists’ groups will be able to perform, People shall get happy moments in Music, Traditionl Dances, Drama, Film and other various exhibitions.

Mr Abraham Bura the event organizing chairperson for this year said that, everything is well prepared and people from different destinations are welcomed.

“Let people from all destinations attend and see people’s creativity in Arts and Culture for the whole week”, says Mr Bura.

The event will be held at the Institutes’ grounds near to the beach of Bagamoyo with the entrance fee of only 2000/ Tanzanian Shillings and only 500/=  for the children.

One of the traditional dances at TaSuBa (from:elimuboratanzania.blogspot.com)

Artists from outside Africa Performing (From : hivisasa.co.tz)

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INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF ARTS AND CULTURE IN BAGAMOYOhttps://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/Seleman/read/367339/international-festival-of-arts-and-culture-in-bagamoyo
INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF ARTS AND CULTURE IN BAGAMOYO
 

ASSOCIATE FRENCH PROFESSOR SPENDS WITH ORPHANS IN TANZANIA   (published in Tanzania)

September 18, 2014 by   Comments(0)

An associate professor Audrey Dumas from the University of Perpignan in France dedicated her time with poor orphans in Tanzania for two weeks. She travelled all the way from France so as to discover how Orphanages work in developing countries like Tanzania. Since she teaches economics at her university, she was also interested with economic issues in the orphanage centers in Africa.

Audrey was so surprised to see the Orphans and the people in general, regardless of their low economic status but they were happy and so welcoming to strangers. This was an experience she liked staying in Tanzania, people are so friendly. She had a happy moment with the children at the orphanage in Dar es Salaam through playing with them and teaching them English.

Audrey says, “In the morning I was teaching them English language and then playing with them after teaching.”

In Tanzania the common language is Swahili and English is spoken by few people who went to school to learn it as a subject. At the Orphanage where Audrey worked  got the chance to be taught English language at their orphanage center even those who have not started going to school got to know some few English words form Audrey who decided to teach them.

Due to the natural attitude of Tanzanians being happy and so welcoming it was easy for Audrey to adopt the environment in her placement, she one day decided to take the children to  play with them at the beach. This was a very happy day both to her and the Children. They spent some hours at the beach swimming, playing different beach games as well as drinking and eating.

“My memorable experience during my volunteering time was when I sent the children to the beach because the children were very happy”, says Audrey.

Audrey completed her volunteering time with a great experience she never had in her life. She thanks a lot Projects Abroad for being a well organized team. During her holiday she promises to come back Tanzania again.

 

Audrey playing with the Orphans

Cards game is most liked by the children

The children enjoyed to be with Audrey who was open and close to them

Audrey taking the Orphans to the beach, she had to hire a local transport Bajaj

Audrey and another Volunteer Miss Zainab entering the beach area with the well dressed children

Helping the children to swim at the beach (Indian Ocean)

She also played different kinds of games with the children, was brilliant!

After swimming and playing at the beach they took a group photo.

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ASSOCIATE FRENCH PROFESSOR SPENDS WITH ORPHANS IN TANZANIAhttps://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/Seleman/read/366961/associate-french-professor-spends-with-orphans-in-tanzania
ASSOCIATE FRENCH PROFESSOR SPENDS WITH ORPHANS IN TANZANIA
 

PROFFESSINAL TEACHER IMPACTS A PRIMARY SCHOOL IN TANZANIA   (published in Tanzania)

September 8, 2014 by   Comments(1)

 

Nathan Beaumont is a professional teacher with a full time job at Lilylane Primary School in Manchester, England. He travelled all the way from England to Tanzania to volunteer with Projects Abroad at a local Primary school named Mbuyuni Primary School in  Dar es Salaam City.

Nathan decided to make a difference in Africa through teaching English and sports.  He knew it would benefit the students if he taught English language as he is a native and the pupils would get the real test.

 ‘‘I was assisting the teacher to teach the pupils spoken English, how to pronounce English words,’’ says Nathan.

Nathan though teaching was a bit difficult but he enjoyed teaching standard three and six classes because the pupils were lovely and always smiling. During his volunteering time Nathan was alone at Mbuyuni primary school. He insists other volunteers to opt for teaching in primary schools since it gives a lot of experience about life in Tanzania.

Nathan adds by saying, ‘‘I am happy that I was able to adopt difficult and different circumstances during my volunteering time.’’

Creativity also made Nathan to be able to stay happy all the time at his placement.  During the free hours he played football with the pupils and other games. Nathan was also able to organize a notable football game between  Mbuyuni Primary School and the Projects Abroad staff members and volunteers. It was a great game because it strengthened the relationship between the volunteers and the school.

In his last days Nathan suggested that future volunteers fully immerse themselves in the culture  and to contact the school in advance in order to better understand what type of classes need to be taught.

‘‘Prepare early and try and contact the school before you arrive to find out which classes to teach. Find out what the kids know and when you are there, accept their way of life,’’ Nathan Says.

During the last week of his project, he was able to make a life history through doing safari to different Tanzania’s national parks like Ngorongoro and Serengeti.

Nathan playing football with the pupils

Active participation in sports

Apart from teaching Nathan also participated in some other works organised by Projects Abroad, this was dirty day during Mandela Day

Nathan giving some instructions to pupils during the match he organised with the Projects Abroad.

Listerning careful on how to make a canal at a local primary school, one of the Projects Abroad charity works in the society

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PROFFESSINAL TEACHER IMPACTS A PRIMARY SCHOOL IN TANZANIAhttps://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/Seleman/read/365759/proffessinal-teacher-impacts-a-primary-school-in-tanzania
PROFFESSINAL TEACHER IMPACTS A PRIMARY SCHOOL IN TANZANIA
 

THE HADZABE : TO BE or NOT TO BE*   (published in Tanzania)

September 4, 2014 by   Comments(0)

                                                      THE HADZABE : To BE or NOT TO BE *

 

            It took much determination , after many false starts, to get there . A Tanzanian friend helped borrow a 4WD and organise a guide , through Tanzanian Cultural Tourism ,Arusha, Tanzania. On arrival at the protected site where we picked up the guide ,we paid a fee to the Hadzabe Community Project which offers medical and other help to the Hadzabe.

The dirt track had seemed to go on for ever with blinding clouds of orange dust and when our vehicle drove to a halt we tumbled out , into the bush, on to dry earth : the baobab trees stood out in this barren landscape, stark and arresting; Lake Nyasi , in the not too far distance, appeared to have very little water; the rocks, to shelter under, perhaps ,were something to behold,flat and layered, dominating the arid land .

I was searching for the Hadzabe . Water is in scarce supply so they get liquid from fruit and understandably do not wash but wait for the rain and dance in it. Trumpeted as Stone Age people ,this did not seem to fit ,as they have some choice and in the face of it determinedly and with dignity, maintain their culture as hunters and gatherers including the skills and resourcefulness required. They shun the modern world. More or less.

Then I saw them - perched under a hanging rock ,like out of a history book , but real. My heart leapt. A group of almost ten males of different ages , squatted, staring over the barren land,wearing skins ( also shrunken clothes ), beaded necklesses and headdresses of fur and/or coloured seeds . I thought I saw bows and arrows propped against the rock face and smoke spiralled upwards from what seemed to be a dying fire : it brought the cliche ‘time stood still ‘ to life. Time stopped for me too: to be so in the moment is an unsurpassable high.

I scrambled up the slope as fast as my trembling legs would carry me and shook hands with each one, and asked ,in as timely a way as possible , if I could photograph them .They nodded in assent but two older men were , I thought ,distant and faraway ,maybe just indifferent ,or maybe I thought later, with great anguish ,suffering an indignity . But, I expect, my anguish was not as great as theirs , if they are surviving , partially, by being ‘exhibited’.

What a moment it was when the two lads arrived glowing with pride, an antelope slung over one of their shoulders , warm and limp, little tongue, hanging out.

They set about skinning ,dissecting and then disembowelling it , with great skill. The skinning was a gripping event, and in the context of preparing food to eat ,not repellent.

Several boys and a child joined in with getting the innards out and their hands were bloodied but deft.

A splinter group was starting a new fire: each one seemingly knowing his role. One stick of wood , held vertically,was put on top of a flat stick of different wood and rotated .  Underneath the flat stick was the flat surface of a knife, to gve a had surface to rotate on , I think. The woods have to be different and one of the woods we saw was kotomanga ( pomegranate ) Turns were taken. Maybe to maintain the strength and dexterity required .( Later, a Rwandan friend explained to me that hands got very hot when rotating the stick so others had to take over.)

Another boy collected the dry grass, another one broke wood for the fire.

Smoke appeared and then a spark, followed  by the grass beginning to glow.

The boy ,who had shot the fatal arrow into the little heart of the antelope, blew into the dried grass and the flames flared .Shortly, the kindling was added. Larger animals eg zebras, were killed with poison arrows which were removed very quickly. 

It was a dance of co-operation .

The older men, sat like statues , sentinels in repose.

The innards were flung on the fire and the skinned antelope was hung on a nearby tree to dry in the sun for future use . I was offered a piece of meat , liver perhaps, and it was good. The immediacy of the little morsel so soon after the kill, was startling. Also the generosity from a hungry tribe.

 The boys then led us to another pile of rocks, a little' citadel,' where other members of this little tribe sat - making bows and arrows,

drying skins, pinned out on the earth, and making decorations for necks, heads, wrists..

The women who were clustered in a group , worked with the ‘beads’ and had the babies crawling around them or on their backs.

Just beyond them were the temporary shelters made of grass . I wanted to peep in, but not intrude , so ultimately just wondered what it would have been like , if on one of my aborted attempts to get there ,I had slept in one of those ‘huts’ : they look both cosy and open to the fresh air. But the snakes ?

As I bought some necklesses , made from seeds mainly, and admired the animal skin garments made from antelope,baboon,zebra , I noted that the young hunters held and cradled the smaller children with pleasure and affection.

But I thought the older women looked detached and even morose. What did they see when they looked into the future ?

The Hadzabe are monogamous and marry into other groups of Hadzabe , on the whole . A marriage is cemented by the families of the future couple hunting and killing a baboon and presenting it to the other family . It is accepted , another baboon is killed and presented ,in turn.They cook and eat the baboons together and then the couple start their new life.

Some of the men with the faraway look in their eyes had scars on their cheeks and seemingly, this scarring on their faces is decoration, not part of a rite of passage . The scarring is done with a knife from another tribe, the Dagoda, and ashes are rubbed in the wound . Presumably ,before this minimal trading , it was done with a sharp stone or stick. At puberty there is neither male or female circumcision . However, if a woman marries out into a tribe where women are expected to be circumcised it is done.

The Hadzabe do not have a calendar, therefore birth dates, death dates are marked by a reference to the season - rainy or dry. When someone dies they join the ancestors. Mourning lasts for about 40 days but how that is counted I do not know. The baobab trees and the sun have spiritual significance but there is no organised religion as we understand it. However, I witnessed gentleness amongst this little group , the capacity for concern. And is that not the message of all religions, apart from the , it seems inevitable fundamentalist pocket , which exists in every culture and religion ?

If a Hadzabe does something ‘bad’ and repeats it he/she is excluded from the tribe but can be allowed back, in time ,if he/she shows remorse and changes his/her behaviour

When I spoke , admiring the skins, the bows and arrows ,

the beads made with seeds or animal parts ,porcupine quills, ( the colours chosen and their arrangement were beautiful ), I spoke in English . I think they may have taken on board, my genuine interest and intonation and I was rewarded by a few words , and how to say’ thank you ‘and ‘good buy ‘ .’ Self-sufficient ?’ I said to one older man as I watched him make strings for the bows and he looked up. I like to think he ‘understood’, as there was eye contact , a slight inclination of the head, and not the looking through or beyond. I hope we shared a moment.

As we headed for the 4WD .The young hunters , standing on some rocks,did , a small dance to celebrate their kill and using their ‘ click click’ language . They reminded me of my son at that age - the joy in accomplishment , the jubilation of self-sufficiency : the world is their oyster.

That evening ,I e-mailed some photographs to family and friends and a doctor friend e-mailed me back immediately : ‘ I think they have a trachoma ‘ she said . ‘That is the faraway look. If a trachoma goes untreated the person will go blind but it can be cured with ointment and prevented by sensible hygiene .

 After making enquiries , I was told of the mobile medical teams ( our fee contributed to that as well ) and how some Hadzabe ,while fiercely independent ,did accept medical help .It should have been reassuring. But then why did so many of this extended family group have this disease and had it been treated at all.? had they refused treatment or were they missed ? how do you find nomadic people ,when they are there one minute and gone the next ?

The Hadzabe are not exhibits to stare at . A photograph is hopefully not a trophy but the sharing of a moment. , an honouring . As a record of personal and tribal history it is intended to be ennobling .

They have so much to offer : a longstanding way of life , beauty and spirit, and an autonomy that in itself puts to shame the aspect of our culture which is press button and couch potato and which cultivates non-thinking, a deadening of the senses. I felt they had pride as in self-respect , even if sad, and how many of us feel that in our complicated cultures and times ? There are 300 Hadzabe left in the area we were in. Wildlife is diminishing , and their land is being eaten up and used by the pastoralists and agriculturalists. There are 1000 Hadzabe left altogether.

I am left with a bad dream from childhood : I would try and scream as ’ a tidal wave ‘ approached, in order to warn people , but no words would come out ,and no one was listening anyway .

But the upbeat ending of the story is that my Tanzanian companions were thrilled ,even proud of this excursion .We would never have done it , if it hadn’t been for you, they enthusiastically told me. But, most importantly ,I think they took a step forward in some kind of understanding : modern technolgy was not the end all and be all of existence.

Who knows what might happen ?

* Shakespeare - Hamlet.

 

If you are interested in a visit contact e-m: rangergotz@yahoo.co.uk. mobile : +255 764 295 280 .

If you want any more information about a project  called the Imani Project which supports indiginous people in extreme poverty,  you can visit www. IMANIPEOPLE.com

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THE HADZABE : TO BE or NOT TO BE*https://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/LaoLao/read/365406/the-hadzabe-to-be-or-not-to-be
THE HADZABE : TO BE or NOT TO BE*
 

Countdown!   (published in Tanzania)

September 3, 2014 by   Comments(1)

Så er der ikke mange dage til at jeg sidder i flyet på vej til Tanzania. 4 dage, for at være helt præcis. Jeg er både spændt og nervøs på samme tid. Mest spændt selvfølgelig, men jeg synes godt nok det er lidt skræmmende, at skulle flyve helt alene til Afrika og bo hos en afrikansk familie, som jeg aldrig har snakket med før. Men jeg ved det nok skal blive en oplevelse, jeg sent vil glemme. 

De første 6 uger skal jeg bo i hovedstaden Dar es Salaam, som ikke ligger langt fra kysten. Temperaturen ligger på mellem 25-30 grader om dagen, og om natten vil den ligge på omkring 20 grader. Lige pt er der regnsæson i Tanzania, så jeg kan nok ikke undgå et ordenligt regnskyl en gang imellem. I Dar es Salaam skal jeg bo hos en familie som består af 2 forældre, som begge er pensioneret. Hos dem bor deres datter og søn, som begge er mellem 25 og 30 år gamle. Udover det skal jeg bo sammen med 2 piger fra Færøerne. De skal arbejde som frivillige på et hospital. Selv, skal jeg hjælpe til på et børnehjem hvor jeg skal hjælpe de ældre børn med at komme i skole, hjælpe dem med lektier når de har fri og lege med de yngre børn, som ikke er gamle nok til at gå i skole endnu, spise frokost med dem, læse bøger osv. 

Efter de første 6 uger er gået flyver jeg til Arusha hvor jeg skal være de næste 6 uger. Arusha ligger tæt på grænsen til Kenya og tæt på Afrikas højeste bjerg, Kilimanjaro. Her er temperaturen en lille smule anderledes om natten, nemlig omkring de 15-17 grader. I Arusha skal jeg bo ved en familie, hvor jeg helt ærligt ikke helt kan forstå familieforholdene. Der er ihvertfald 2 piger, som er 15 og 16 år gamle. (Og ingen hunde) I Arusha skal jeg arbejde på en lille avis, som hedder Ujumbe Magazine. Det er en avis, hvor der ingen faste medarbejdere er, kun frivillige fra hele verden. Her består mit arbejde i at skrive artikler, blogge, tage billeder, interviewe andre frivillige osv. 

Jeg glæder mig rigtig meget til begge projekter, og vil løbende holde, jer der er interesseret, opdateret omkring min rejse! :-)

 

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Countdown!https://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/jlarsen4/read/365270/countdown
Countdown!
 

Countdown!   (published in Tanzania)

September 3, 2014 by   Comments(0)

Så er der ikke mange dage til at jeg sidder i flyet på vej til Tanzania. 4 dage, for at være helt præcis. Jeg er både spændt og nervøs på samme tid. Mest spændt selvfølgelig, men jeg synes godt nok det er lidt skræmmende, at skulle flyve helt alene til Afrika og bo hos en afrikansk familie, som jeg aldrig har snakket med før. Men jeg ved det nok skal blive en oplevelse, jeg sent vil glemme. 

De første 6 uger skal jeg bo i hovedstaden Dar es Salaam, som ikke ligger langt fra kysten. Temperaturen ligger på mellem 25-30 grader om dagen, og om natten vil den ligge på omkring 20 grader. Lige pt er der regnsæson i Tanzania, så jeg kan nok ikke undgå et ordenligt regnskyl en gang imellem. I Dar es Salaam skal jeg bo hos en familie som består af 2 forældre, som begge er pensioneret. Hos dem bor deres datter og søn, som begge er mellem 25 og 30 år gamle. Udover det skal jeg bo sammen med 2 piger fra Færøerne. De skal arbejde som frivillige på et hospital. Selv, skal jeg hjælpe til på et børnehjem hvor jeg skal hjælpe de ældre børn med at komme i skole, hjælpe dem med lektier når de har fri og lege med de yngre børn, som ikke er gamle nok til at gå i skole endnu, spise frokost med dem, læse bøger osv. 

Efter de første 6 uger er gået flyver jeg til Arusha hvor jeg skal være de næste 6 uger. Arusha ligger tæt på grænsen til Kenya og tæt på Afrikas højeste bjerg, Kilimanjaro. Her er temperaturen en lille smule anderledes om natten, nemlig omkring de 15-17 grader. I Arusha skal jeg bo ved en familie, hvor jeg helt ærligt ikke helt kan forstå familieforholdene. Der er ihvertfald 2 piger, som er 15 og 16 år gamle. (Og ingen hunde) I Arusha skal jeg arbejde på en lille avis, som hedder Ujumbe Magazine. Det er en avis, hvor der ingen faste medarbejdere er, kun frivillige fra hele verden. Her består mit arbejde i at skrive artikler, blogge, tage billeder, interviewe andre frivillige osv. 

Jeg glæder mig rigtig meget til begge projekter, og vil løbende holde, jer der er interesseret, opdateret omkring min rejse! :-)

 

(0 from 0 votes)
 
Countdown!https://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/jlarsen4/read/365269/countdown
Countdown!