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September 2013

Dirty Day at Naserian Orphanage and School   (published in Tanzania)

September 17, 2013 by   Comments(0)

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The August Dirty Day was held at Naserian Orphanage in Arusha. Naserian is one of the care placements of Projects Abroad. The 2 Week Special volunteers worked tirelessly for two weeks painting and sanding the dormitories and classrooms in July. However, the external face was in need of renovation. The staff from the school and the children later expressed their gratitude for the labor of the volunteers.

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Dirty Day at Naserian Orphanage and Schoolhttps://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/tanzania-social-manager/read/306623/dirty-day-at-naserian-orphanage-and-school
Dirty Day at Naserian Orphanage and School
 

Volunteers and Staff compete in the 5K Corporate Challenge/Safari Marathon   (published in Tanzania)

September 17, 2013 by   Comments(0)

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On Sunday, September 8, a team of 17 staff and volunteers participated in the 4th Annual Safari Marathon in Arusha. The race began just after sunrise at 7:15am. Despite the early start time, Team Tanzania was full of energy and excited to be a part of the large crowd.

A few members of the team finished in the Top 15 including Gustav Lange (DEN) finished 16th; NicoloCosmelli (ITA) 17th; Theresa Kolbe (GER) 18th; and Moses Phineas (TAN) 23rd.  Volunteers Emily Haw (AUS) and Emily Hassinger (USA) also had strong finishes.

The purpose of the Safari Marathon is to promote sports and fitness in Tanzania and to build support for local athletes/runners with aspirations for the Olympics. For more info visit www.safarimarathon.com.

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Volunteers and Staff compete in the 5K Corporate Challenge/Safari Marathonhttps://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/tanzania-social-manager/read/306615/volunteers-and-staff-compete-in-the-5k-corporate-challengesafari-marathon
Volunteers and Staff compete in the 5K Corporate Challenge/Safari Marathon
 

New Care Placement in Dar Es Salaam   (published in Tanzania)

September 17, 2013 by   Comments(0)

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St. Gemma Galgani Nursery School is a local school for small children age 3-7. The school is run by sisters belonging to a Catholic mission. Teaching is done in a one big room which is still under construction. The school is currently in need of teaching resources. There are approximately 20 students attending the school from various economic backgrounds. A volunteer will be responsible to care and teach children at school. There will be a teacher who will work closely with volunteers and there is a lot of outside space so volunteers can be creative. Possible activities include teaching assistance with English, Math and other subjects; playing games and teaching songs; marking homework, sports and art and helping to feed the children. The school is open between 8am and 3pm and located in a scenic compound in Northern Dar Es Salaam.

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New Care Placement in Dar Es Salaamhttps://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/tanzania-social-manager/read/306601/new-care-placement-in-dar-es-salaam
New Care Placement in Dar Es Salaam
 

UK volunteer raises $10k to purchase medical equipment for local hospital   (published in Tanzania)

September 17, 2013 by   Comments(0)

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So my name is Jeremy Ousey and I’m 18 years old. Between my two years of sixth form I decided to go out to Tanzania to do some medical volunteer work with Projects Abroad and I had what can only be described as a life-changing experience. Having done work-experience in UK hospitals to then work in a Tanzanian hospital was an unfathomable jump. I went from barely being allowed to speak to patients to being required to help deliver babies because the hospital wards were short of staff. But an eye opening as that was; what was truly amazing was the equipment, or lack thereof, that they used. On a regular basis there were power cuts, which make working in a hospital rather tricky-to the point where people were being stitched up by the light of a mobile phone. Nearly every day that I was working on the labour ward would start with me making a quick trip to the local pharmacy to buy 4 or 5 boxes of examination gloves as the labour ward had run out! And as I’m sure you can imagine, when the labour ward runs out of gloves: everything would grind to a halt.

Of course, not all my time was spent working in the labour ward. I tried to learn as much as I could about their style of medicine, and so whilst working in the medical wards (of which there are three, one for men, one for women and one for children (Unlike the multitude there are in hospitals in the UK) I got to see some truly incredible, in every sense of the word, conditions and methods of working. The thing which stands out as strangest was the fact that there could be two or even three patients to a single bed, just because of a lack of space. After that is probably the lack of equipment that the staff and hospital had to make do with; for example in each ward there was only one blood pressure machine and one stethoscope – two of the, arguably, most important items in a doctor’s arsenal, and yet the doctors had to wait and share these items of equipment between a ward of 20 beds…and possibly even more patients!

Despite, these shocking concepts, I loved the time I spent out there and grew to understand, respect and love the people and their culture and so I decided that I have to return there for part of my Gap Year (starting in March 2013), and as I’m doing that, I feel that I should try and give them something of my, and our, culture.

Jeremy returned to Tanzania for 3 months from March until June. He made the equipment donation of 6,000 GBP before he went home.

To learn more about his project visit the website for Project Huruma or Facebook Page

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UK volunteer raises $10k to purchase medical equipment for local hospitalhttps://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/tanzania-social-manager/read/306580/uk-volunteer-raises-10k-to-purchase-medical-equipment-for-local-hospital
UK volunteer raises $10k to purchase medical equipment for local hospital
 

Building Project is a family affair for the Thibaults   (published in Tanzania)

September 17, 2013 by   Comments(0)

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Eric Thibault says his daughter Gabrielle (16) was the inspiration for their two week trip to Tanzania. “She always wanted to participate in a humanitarian project abroad. We decided to turn this into a family experience.”

Along with Eric, his wife Natalie and son Guillaume (14) departed Quebec, Canada in August to work on the Building Project at Suma Engikaret School. Volunteers are valuable to the building project because the work is labour-intensive and the local fundis (builders) need all the help they can get.

Part of their daily responsibilities included mixing cement, carrying sand and stones, shovelling sand and rocks, cutting wood and building cement frames with wood timber. The Thibaults were given directions from the fundi. One of the main challenges was learning to do construction work without electricity and machines.

When they weren’t busy building, Eric took time out to teach two math classes during class time. They also enjoyed playing ball games with the students from the school. However the most memorable moment for the family was meeting 15 giraffe within walking distance of the school.

Suma Engikaret is located about 50km outside of Arusha town on the way to Nairobi. The landscape is extremely dry and access to water is a luxury. However, on the plus side both Mt. Meru and Mt. Kilamnajaro are in viewing distance.

Eric says that Gabrielle kept a detailed diary during the trip which she will use to write a book and Guillame has plans to do a presentation at his school.

Projects Abroad has completed three projects at the building project including a water reservoir, one classroom building, a dormitory and several toilet facilities. Volunteers are currently working on completing an additional classroom/science lab and houses for the teachers.

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Building Project is a family affair for the Thibaultshttps://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/tanzania-social-manager/read/306574/building-project-is-a-family-affair-for-the-thibaults
Building Project is a family affair for the Thibaults
 

High School Volunteer Donates Mosquito Nets to Orphanage   (published in Tanzania)

September 17, 2013 by   Comments(0)

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Renee Muers (17) arrived in Arusha, Tanzania for the 2 Week High School Special program in mid-July. She particiapted as a volunteer for the Care & Community Project at Naserian Orphange. Renee, who is from the Netherlands, joined several other international volunteers for renovating and painting the interior of the orphanage/school's dormitories and classrooms. Before leaving Tanzania, Renee left behind a financial donation to support the basic needs of the school. It was decided that the greatest need was mosquito nets for the 46 beds where the children sleep. Mosquito nets are vital in Sub-Saharan Africa where Malaria continues to be a life-threatening virus especially for young children.

 

 

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High School Volunteer Donates Mosquito Nets to Orphanagehttps://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/tanzania-social-manager/read/306569/high-school-volunteer-donates-mosquito-nets-to-orphanage
High School Volunteer Donates Mosquito Nets to Orphanage
 

The kuku family at Tumaini For Africa gets bigger!   (published in Tanzania)

September 10, 2013 by   Comments(0)

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 In July, high school volunteers with the Care & Community Project built a chicken house as part of the 2 Week Special program. After building the chicken house, Projects Abroad Tanzania donated 49 adult chickens to the orphanage.

The purpose of building the chicken coup is to supply the children at the school with eggs to eat in addition to an income for the orphanage from selling the eggs to the community.

I visited TFA last week to welcome 45 new chicks to the family. Now there are are total of 94 chickens living at TFA!!! The baby chickens will grow into egg producing adults and eventually replace the larger chickens which will be eaten or sold for their meat.

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The kuku family at Tumaini For Africa gets bigger!https://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/tanzania-social-manager/read/305660/the-kuku-family-at-tumaini-for-africa-gets-bigger
The kuku family at Tumaini For Africa gets bigger!
 

Medical volunteer donates 200 eyeglasses to local hospital   (published in Tanzania)

September 10, 2013 by   Comments(0)

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One of the best ways to explore career options after graduating high school is to get field experience. That’s exactly what 18 year old Kieran Dash did upon completion of his education at Loughborough Grammar School.

“I am currently taking a gap year before I apply to medical school. I wanted to volunteer in Tanzania to help me mature and also experience a different culture and different types of medical care, after carrying out work experience in British hospitals and GP practices.”

Kieran arrived in Arusha, Tanzania in mid-July to embark upon a one month medical placement at a local hospital coordinated by Projects Abroad, a global volunteering organization with various projects all over the world.

“I really enjoyed that I managed to get lots of hands on experience in the hospitals in Tanzania, and built up relations with the staff in the hospitals, whilst also getting to socialise with local Tanzanian people and fellow volunteers.”

Kieran did not come to Tanzania empty h

anded. He received a substantial donation from his father’s optometry practice.

 

“There was a build up of unwanted and unused prescription glasses from people in the UK and so when I decided to come to Tanzania I thought they could be of use to people in Tanzania that had limited numbers of prescription glasses.”

He managed to pack and  transport approximately 200 prescription glasses and sunglasses in his suitcase. Eye glasses and optometrists are rare in Tanzania and contact lenses are virtually unheard of, so the donation was greatly appreciated and needed at the hospital.

“The staff were delighted and amazed by the sheer number of glasses that I had managed to bring and donate, and were very grateful for all of them.”

 

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Medical volunteer donates 200 eyeglasses to local hospitalhttps://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/tanzania-social-manager/read/305659/medical-volunteer-donates-200-eyeglasses-to-local-hospital
Medical volunteer donates 200 eyeglasses to local hospital