click to dismiss

Please logged in to see pending comments.

UsernamePassword

| Lost password

Welcome to My Trip Blog, if you are a member please sign in.

Recent blog posts worldwide

RSS


Semana Santa (Holy Week)   (published in Mexico)

March 31, 2013 by   Comments(0)

I knew that Holy Week here would be something else but what an experience.

On Thursday night I went to the Mass of the Washing of the Feet in the Cathedral. Before Mass Francisco took me round the back to the sacrtisties where I saw the twelve apostles all dressed and ready. I was also introduced to the Bishop, Braulio Rafael Leon Villegas. He was very gracious and spoke to me in English. I keep writing that the cathedral was packed but it seems it always is, and with people of all ages.

Friday was a really big day with a re-enactment of the Way of the Cross. Stages had been set up on the steps in front of the cathedral to represent the Temple, Pilate's praetorium and Herod's palace. Even before it began the plaza was full of people. "Jesus" was brought out and taken to the priests, then to Pilate, then Herod and back to Pilate before being taken up on to the balcony of the cathedral to be whipped. It was all very realistic and presented with great acting and accompanied by music and sound effects. While all this drama was going on outside there was a very reverent Stations of the Cross being led by the Bishop inside.

Francisco and I then began the climb up to "Calvary". We did not follow "Jesus", the crowd and the soldiers but made our way more quickly (if you can go up hills quickly) to the site of the crucifixion.Not many places would have such an ideal site, on a hillside overlooking the town surrounded by rocky cliffs. There was a crowd in place by when we arrived but they kept coming and coming. There were stalls selling cold drinks, food and ice cream but that did not take away from the solemnity of the occasion. There were probably similar stalls lining the streets of Jerusalem on the first Good Friday. Although the performance did not go to the extremes seen ...

(0 from 0 votes)
 
Semana Santa (Holy Week)http://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/cgrimward/read/276618/semana-santa-holy-week
Semana Santa (Holy Week)
 

Semana Santa   (published in Peru)

March 31, 2013 by   Comments(0)

This past week has been Semana Santa, what we would call Easter week, but so much more. Peru is a very devoutly Catholic country, with the concept of being an atheist not really entertained. As such Easter is a seriously big deal. Every day in Urubamba this week there have been processions of Jesus around the town, and since Friday my family have been going to church from about 5pm-10pm every night. Hard core! 

One of the big bonuses of this crazy religion was the meal on Friday. 12 courses, to celebrate the 12 disciples at the last supper. Actually we only had eight, plus water and tea, which seems pretty unfair to the disciples left out. But fair enough in terms of the amount of cooking! I shall explain in detailk the dishes we had, so if for some reason this holds no interest to you (weirdos) then scroll to the end. 

1. a salad of boiled and blanched broad beans with onion and tomato in a limey dressing, with a slice of potato. Yummy and a light way to start the meal. And before you begin to feel full just thinking about all this foos it was tiny portions!

2. a soup of the sea, with seaweed and loads of fish eggs in. Kind of weird, not exactly delicious but tasty in a fishy kind of way. The fish eggs were nothing like caviar, much crunchier, and all strung together on nasty membrane stuff. It´s the only dish which every family has to have in this meal, and the only time of year they´re allowed to eat it.

3. causa, a dish made from layers of mashed potato seasoned with mild chillies, with tuna mayo in between. Sounds a bit nasty but is so so yummy.

4. fried fish with fried potato. No meat is allowed to be eaten in the whole meal.

5. now on to pudding. First was apples and peaches poached in a dark sugar syrup. Very yummy.

6. empanadas de semana ...

(0 from 0 votes)
 
Semana Santahttp://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/tserle/read/276611/semana-santa
Semana Santa
 

Dykker med søløver!   (published in Ecuador)

March 31, 2013 by   Comments(1)

Så har jeg haft min første dykkeroplevelse! 
Utrolig skræmmende og spændende på samme tid. Vi dykkede ca. 2-3 m. ned og derefter frem og tilbage fra to punkter. Alt i mens at søløverne kredsede om os, kiggede på os og undersøgte os fra hoved til tå!!!! Kan slet ikke beskrive det med ord! Om ca. to timer skal jeg i vandet igen for at træne med scales/vægte, så jeg kan finde min rette vægt under vandet, så jeg hverken synker eller flyder. Jeg er konstant lidt nervøs, men sikke et kick det giver. Det er virkelig som de siger; en helt anden verden!

(0 from 0 votes)
 
Dykker med søløver!http://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/MathildeKJ/read/276610/dykker-med-slver
Dykker med søløver!
 

Moving up to big school!   (published in Peru)

March 31, 2013 by   Comments(0)

For the past couple of weeks I´ve been in big school, teaching English to kids between 11 and 16. Scary stuff! It was rather daunting initially, especially when they started interrogating me in rapid Spanish. ´Do you have any pets? What´s your favourite food? What´s England like? Do you have a boyfriend?´etc. But the feeling of being the new-kid is starting to wear off!

School starts every day at 8, when they do a whole school chant and march (a bit odd, not quite sure what they´re saying, but something to do with working extra hard everyday for the service of the world). Then we have two double lessons, then a 30 minute break, and then one more double and one single. And then that´s it! They all finish school at 1:45. The school is called agropecuario,  which means it´s a farming school (they actually have lessons in farming), and most of the children come from families who work in farming. As such they all go home to help on the farm, while the city kids get to go home just to watch tv. 

As they have one double English lesson a week (only 1.5 hours) it´s nigh on impossible to fit in the full government prescribed syllabus. Most of the 16 year olds are still working from the first text book, and their English is very basic. Really basic is an exageration. The majority struggled to say ´How old are you?´. It´s a shame as they´re really eager to learn, and their teacher (who I work with) is a really good teacher, engaging and funny. With more time every week they coule be progressing so much faster, and in a county where tourism is the fastest rising industry they really do need English. 

But apart from that little rant it´s great. I feel like I´m learning as much as ...

(0 from 0 votes)
 
Moving up to big school!http://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/tserle/read/276606/moving-up-to-big-school
Moving up to big school!
 

Moving up to big school!   (published in Peru)

March 31, 2013 by   Comments(0)

For the past couple of weeks I´ve been in big school, teaching English to kids between 11 and 16. Scary stuff! It was rather daunting initially, especially when they started interrogating me in rapid Spanish. ´Do you have any pets? What´s your favourite food? What´s England like? Do you have a boyfriend?´etc. But the feeling of being the new-kid is starting to wear off!

School starts every day at 8, when they do a whole school chant and march (a bit odd, not quite sure what they´re saying, but something to do with working extra hard everyday for the service of the world). Then we have two double lessons, then a 30 minute break, and then one more double and one single. And then that´s it! They all finish school at 1:45. The school is called agropecuario,  which means it´s a farming school (they actually have lessons in farming), and most of the children come from families who work in farming. As such they all go home to help on the farm, while the city kids get to go home just to watch tv. 

As they have one double English lesson a week (only 1.5 hours) it´s nigh on impossible to fit in the full government prescribed syllabus. Most of the 16 year olds are still working from the first text book, and their English is very basic. Really basic is an exageration. The majority struggled to say ´How old are you?´. It´s a shame as they´re really eager to learn, and their teacher (who I work with) is a really good teacher, engaging and funny. With more time every week they coule be progressing so much faster, and in a county where tourism is the fastest rising industry they really do need English. 

But apart from that little rant it´s great. I feel like I´m learning as much as ...

(0 from 0 votes)
 
Moving up to big school!http://www.mytripblog.org/pg/blog/tserle/read/276605/moving-up-to-big-school
Moving up to big school!
 

Country Blogs

See what is going on with Projects Abroad!
   Global News
   Blog Round Up
   Argentina
   Bolivia
   Botswana
   Cambodia
   China
   Costa Rica
   Ecuador
   Ethiopia
   Fiji
   Ghana
   India
   Jamaica
   Kenya
   Mexico
   Moldova
   Mongolia
   Morocco
   Nepal
   Peru
   Philippines
   Romania
   Samoa
   Senegal
   South Africa
   Sri Lanka
   Tanzania
   Thailand
   Togo
   Uganda
   Vietnam
Advanced search


Instagram